Forman (1971)

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Forman, Paul. (1971) Weimar culture, causality, and quantum theory, 1918-1927: Adaptation by German physicists and mathematicians to a hostile intellectual environment. Historical studies in the physical sciences 3, 1-115.

Title Weimar culture, causality, and quantum theory, 1918-1927: Adaptation by German physicists and mathematicians to a hostile intellectual environment
Resource Type journal article
Author(s) Paul Forman
Year 1971
Journal Historical studies in the physical sciences
Volume 3
Pages 1-115

Abstract

In perhaps the most original and suggestive section of his book on The Conceptual Development of Quantum Mechanics Max Jammer contended "that certain philosophical ideas of the late nineteenth century not only prepared the intellectual climate for, but contributed decisively to, the formation of the new conceptions of the modern quantum theory"; specifically, "contingentism, existentialism, pragmatism, and logical empiricism, rose in reaction to traditional rationalism and conventional metaphysics. . . . Their affirmation of a concrete conception of life and their rejection of an abstract intellectualism culminated in their doctrine of free will, their denial of mechanical determinism or of metaphysical causality. United in rejecting causality though on different grounds, these currents of thought prepared, so to speak, the philosophical background for modern quantum mechanics. They contributed with suggestions to the formative stage of the new conceptual scheme and subsequently promoted its acceptance."

Contributors

Calahan Janik-Jones (100.0%)