Herman von Helmholtz

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Herman von Helmholtz (21 August 1821 – 8 September 1894) was a German physiologist and physicist who contributed to a variety of scientific and philosophical topics. Helmholtz participated in two of the most significant developments in physics and in the philosophy of science in the 19th century: the proof that Euclidean geometry does not describe the only possible visualizable and physical space, and the shift from physics based on actions between particles at a distance to the field theory. Helmholtz achieved a staggering number of scientific results, including the formulation of energy conservation, the vortex equations for fluid dynamics, the notion of free energy in thermodynamics, and the invention of the ophthalmoscope. His constant interest in the epistemology of science guarantees his enduring significance for philosophy.


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Paul Patton (100.0%)