Indicators of Method Employment

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What historical facts serve as indicators that a method of theory appraisal is employed by a scientific community?

Methods of theory appraisal are different in different communities and change over time. 1pp. 24-21 These methods are not always explicitly stated. The question at issue is what sort of historical evidence indicates a particular method is employed by a particular scientific community. 1pp. 117-120

In the scientonomic context, this question was first formulated by Hakob Barseghyan in 2015. The question is currently accepted as a legitimate topic for discussion by Scientonomy community. Indicators of Method Employment (Barseghyan-2015) is currently accepted by Scientonomy community as the best available theory on the subject. Indicators of Method Employment (Barseghyan-2015) states "The employed method of theory appraisal of a community at some time is not necessarily indicated by the methodological texts of that time and must be inferred from actual patterns of theory acceptance and other indirect evidence."

History

Acceptance Record

Here is the complete acceptance record of this question (it includes all the instances when the question was accepted as a legitimate topic for discussion by a community):
CommunityAccepted FromAcceptance IndicatorsStill AcceptedAccepted UntilRejection Indicators
Scientonomy1 January 2016This is when the community accepted its first answer to this question, Indicators of Method Employment(Barseghyan 2015), which indicates that the question is itself considered legitimate.Yes

All Theories

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TheoryFormulationFormulated In
Indicators of Method Employment (Barseghyan-2015)The employed method of theory appraisal of a community at some time is not necessarily indicated by the methodological texts of that time and must be inferred from actual patterns of theory acceptance and other indirect evidence.2015
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Accepted Theories

The following theories have been accepted as answers to this question:
CommunityTheoryAccepted FromAccepted Until
ScientonomyIndicators of Method Employment (Barseghyan-2015)1 January 2016

Suggested Modifications

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Current View

In Scientonomy community, the accepted theory on the subject is Indicators of Method Employment (Barseghyan-2015). It states: "The employed method of theory appraisal of a community at some time is not necessarily indicated by the methodological texts of that time and must be inferred from actual patterns of theory acceptance and other indirect evidence." One putative method of learning the employed method of the time is by studying texts concerning scientific methodology to learn what method was prescribed by the community or advocated by great scientists. However, such indicators can yield incorrect results. During the second half of the eighteenth century and the first half of the nineteenth century, the scientific community explicitly advocated the empiricist-inductivist methodology championed by Isaac Newton. This methodology held that new theories should be deduced from phenomena, and that unobservable entities should not be posited. However, the historical record actually shows that several theories positing unobservable entities did, in fact, become accepted during this period. These include Benjamin Franklin's theory of electricity, which posited an unobservable electric fluid, the phlogiston theory of combustion, and the theory that li… Read More

Open Questions

The following related topic(s) currently lack an accepted answer:

  • Methodology and Methods: Can a method become employed by being the deductive consequence of an already accepted methodology? How would this affect the Methodology Can Shape Methods theorem? The topic has no accepted answer in Scientonomy.

Related Topics

This topic is also related to the following topic(s):

References

  1. a b  Barseghyan, Hakob. (2015) The Laws of Scientific Change. Springer.

Contributors

Paul Patton (100.0%)